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Happy (Healthy) Halloween!

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64-Non-Candy-Halloween-Snack-Ideas-deviled-eggs64-Non-Candy-Halloween-Snack-Ideas-boo-nanna-pops64-Non-Candy-Halloween-Snack-Ideas-spider-sandwiches

Helpful ideas for a healthy and creative Halloween. I had a ball making the “Boo” Nana pops and the Jack o’ lantern hummus plate! For more fun, check out 64 delicious ideas here:

http://www.listotic.com/64-non-candy-halloween-snack-ideas/

Have fun this weekend!
~Lisa Lis~

 
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Posted by on October 31, 2014 in Unedited Quill Spills

 

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Tom Hanks’ Random Act of Kindness for One New York City Cab Driver

Tom Hanks’ Random Act of Kindness for One New York City Cab Driver

Originally posted on Kindness Blog:

The winner for best celebrity of the day goes to Tom Hanks!

In a new post on Humans of New York, a cab driver shared a memorable experience driving the legendary actor.

Tom Hanks' Random Act of Kindness

Humans of New York/Instagram

After hesitating to accept a fare into his car because his shift was almost over, the driver ultimately decided to let the man in for a ride on Park Avenue to 74th Street.

“He’s got his cap pulled down way over his eyes, so I can’t see who it is,” he shared. “But pretty soon I start to recognize his voice. And when we get to a light, I turn to him, and I look him in the eye, and I scream: ‘WIIIIIIILLLSSSSSOOOOOOON!!!’ And that really got him. He started laughing hard.”

Tom Hanks

Splash News

He added, “He sees that I’ve got this Ferrari hat on, and a Ferrari shirt too, so…

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Author Interview with Donald E. Allen

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If you don’t already know of Donald E. Allen… you soon will. His writing talent is in my best top 5 and he continues to amaze his readers with each new piece he writes. Check out his work here:

and on his blog: DonaldEAllen.Blogspot.com
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1. When did you start putting pen to paper?
Creatively, my first work of note in the world of fiction would be dated sometime in the 5th grade. You see, one Friday, we were taken to the school library and told we could check out any book we wanted to read. I checked out a cowboy book. The following Monday, quite to my surprise, we were lined up in the hall and taken back to the library to return the books. We were then marched back to the classroom, given pen and paper, and told to write a book report. Now I hope that you noticed that I never mentioned that I read the book over the weekend, did I? My book report was a marvelous piece of fiction, written well beyond my years. My teachers loved it so much one of my teachers couldn’t wait to check out the book and bring it
home for her son to read. All I remember of the teachers reaction was a number of very strange looks over the following weeks of the school year. As an adult, I put pen to paper after retiring at the age of 58 and asking myself, “What’s next?”

2. What’s your literary poison – prose, poetry, etc.?
I love them both, yet my poison would be poetry. Nothing gets into your blood like poetry, and Nothing is all that poetry will give you in this lifetime, because poets die poor, and the only known poets, are dead poets. It is poison. (cue melodramatic music; fade to black.)

3. Who is your favorite fictional hero?
As a child it was Mr. Peek-a-boo. I kid you not. He was played by the actor Wally Cox. His special power was being able to walk through walls. At the age of four or five I tried to imitate him by walking through the wall in our kitchen. It did not work, and so my disillusionment with the world around me began. As an adult, all my heroes are non-fiction, such as the passengers on flight 93 who fought back.

4. Which famous writer can you most identify with?
Number one, Rod Serling. My short fiction is often bizarre has a twisted ending; Edgar Alan Poe, When I am writing on the dark side; Robert Frost, when the poetry dial is set to “NORMAL.” Ernest Hemmingway when I look in the mirror, or drink too much Irish Whisky… or should I say, Ernest Hemmingway, when I drink too much Irish Whisky and look in the mirror?

5. What are your current projects?
I have an average of twelve irons in the fire at any one time. My Novella “When the Ripper Calls” is still selling well on Amazon.com. My Historical Fiction “April 1861″, a poetry chap book, is due out
very soon. At this moment I am waiting for the Publishers Proof of April 1861 to show up. I blog, DonaldEAllen.Blogspot.com, I use my blog to post many different examples of my writing from poetry to
SciFi, and everything in between. I am constantly writing new poetry and short fiction, and when I find myself wide awake in the wee hours I load up a short story and start pumping literary growth hormones into it. Whether it turns out to be a longer short story, a novella, or a novel – all depends on how long it is when I’ve finished telling the story.

6. If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book or writing piece?
I make changes until the moment a piece is published. Should I ever be in a situation where a glaring mistake has evaded the radar of two dozen editorial and beta market readers, then I would do a re-write /
corrected second edition, but so far, so good. My writing is fluid until the day it is published. A comma here, a chapter rewrite there, fluid, growing, and I hope improving. My biggest problem with this high level of fluidity in my creative process is keeping the latest versions loaded on all my devices … NO I do NOT trust the cloud to do this for me. I have a back-up drive that dynamically updates every time I save a change to my hard drive, and the back-up drive is configured as Network Area Storage, and is portable.

7. Do you have any advice for other writers?
Yes. Look back at the last sentence of answer #5. Just write the story. When you are finished do a word count on it. The word count determines “What you have written.” If you start out by saying, “I’m going to write a short story, or I’m going to write a novel,” you are not doing yourself –or the story proper justice.

8. What were your grades like in English class? (A, B, anything less than this is shameful.)
Shame on me. I had a solid C+ average for the entire length of my enlistment in the American Educational System. If it wasn’t for Bill Gates and Spell Check, I would be a fisherman — not a writer. Remember your teachers telling you, “Spell it like it sounds?” Well, I have been hearing impaired since the age of 7 ( No, not a Mr. Peak-a-boo related accident.) Do you really want me to spell it the way it sounds to me? Well I tried that, and like I said, solid C+ average. I was however 4.0 in both my majors, Computer Science and Psychology.

9. How much research do you do for your writing?
A minimum of 1.16 tons. Every conscientious writer does a ton of research. After I have done my ton of research I take my manuscript to workshops. Workshops are great. I consider the ones I have found to be SUPER! However, every once in a while you will run across some pompous ass who thinks he or she is an expert on the subject you are mentioning in your writing. I listen intently to these “experts,” I take notes, and do a cursory investigation of their comments. 99 times out of 100 they are wrong, but that one rare instance when they said something of value is worth the trouble of paying attention to even the most obnoxious member of any workshop.

10. Do you write on a typewriter, computer, dictate or longhand?
My primary production is done on computer. Capturing the moment of inspiration is often done longhand on any flat surface, with whatever I can get my hands on to leave a mark. I also use a digital voice recording app on my mini-tablet if the urge strikes while I’m driving. OMG, If you ever see me screaming or delivering a rousing oration while behind the wheel of my car, trust me, I am dictating into my Digital Voice Recorder, LOL, but the sight of my doing it does make other drivers stay a safe distance away from my car.

11. What is the best advice you’ve been given?
WOW, what a writing prompt that is. I’ll limit my response to writing advice. Like I stated before, just write the story. Don’t worry about how long it will be, the story will tell you. Then of course there is advice from my first writing workshop facilitator, Mary Haughey, who told me, “Don, why don’t you try to write a poem?” So I did, and that first poem I ever wrote won Newsday’s Garden Poetry contest…and thus, the monster was born. Mary is still going strong at the age of…(Well, a gentlemen would never tell), and I still attend her workshops every chance I get.

12. What book do you think everyone should read?
Oh let me see….um…”When the ripper calls” of course, followed by “April 1861.” The second one is a little hard to do at the moment being “April 1861″ hasn’t hit the presses yet. And of course there is “Feedback.” OK, enough with the book plugs. So now I’ll move on to the forbidden subjects of religion and politics. Honestly I think everyone should read the Bible front to back at least once, I’ve done it twice. Reading it front to back gives you a new perspective on the entire work, and for many people, a new appreciation and level of spiritual awakening. Moving on to politics, there is another, much shorter book called “How to Lie with Charts.” A very useful book, both offensively and defensively in the corporate world. BUT, I tell people that when the finish reading that book, they should view Al Gore’s movie, “An Inconvenient Truth,” and see how many AH-HA moments they can discover in that film for themselves.

13. Two-part question: Do you play an musical instrument? And what instrument would you like to learn to
Play? I played the drums in school. My ear problems precluded my playing any wind instruments, and the violin was for sissies way back then. As I listen to music today, I often imagine playing all my favorite songs, but the reality is there are usually
three or even four guitars or some other combination of instruments bringing those classic riffs to life. Therefore I would wave my magic wand and play a double necked 24 string guitar, with synthesizer output option. If you’re going to dream, dream big. Oh, and I’ll also need a voice synthesizer so I can sing like Roy Orbison, Mick Jagger, or Lionel Richie with the flick of a switch. I’d add Stevie Nicks to the list, but I am afraid of what flicking that switch might do to me.

14. What process did (or are you going) you go through to get your book published?
Let me clear this up for all the writers who are still unpublished out there. There is very little difference in the level of effort required to get your book published, no matter what path you follow. I self published “When the Ripper Calls.” It didn’t save me any effort, just the end game delay in finding a publisher. “April 1861″ on the other hand is rather unique. I won a publishers writing contest and the prize was being published. In this complete switch, the publisher picked me. There is some delay in this methods end-game compared to self publishing because the manuscript has to go through the publishers editorial staff, and formatting staff, to make sure it meets their publishing standard, after all, their name is going on it too. The good part of this is, now they know me. If “April 1861″ sells well, they are going to want to maintain the relationship.

15. Who would you like to change places with… i.e. live someone else’s life for a week?
Again, what a great writing prompt. Hell I could do a whole series on this one. Let’s see, The President of the United States. I’d tell the truth for a week, and the world would never be the same. My wife, and I’d hope I’m not a total drag to live with. Adolph Hitler. … Ah, now things get complicated. If I die or commit suicide while in the other person for the week, do I die and experience their afterlife, and then come back to being me? Can I alter history as the other person? This could be a book.

16. If you weren’t a writer, what would be your ideal profession?
One that pays good money. Now there are folks who scrape out a living writing for newspapers and magazines, but: If you go to the book store you will see thousands of books, written by perhaps one
thousand different authors. A few dozen of those authors make a living writing books … (none of them will be poets) … Everyone else is either writing as a hobby, or as a quick-hit sideline for Political Pundits, TV personalities and Movie Stars. And that my friends, is the hard truth.

17. Two-part question: Bill Murray or Chevy Chase? And John Cleese or Michael Palin?
Bill Murray and John Cleese, from your list. My list selections would be Eddie Izzard and Buddy Hackett with Benny Hill running a very close third.

18. What’s your most rewarding literary accomplishment to date (one that just blew your mind!)
Winning the Newsday contest. Early on I needed independent confirmation of talent. The win in the Newsday contest answered the questions: Was I wasting my time? Was this just a dead end or a passing fancy? Am I just kidding myself. The answer to all these was a resounding NO! I needed that, and I got it. The timing was perfect.

19. What quote do you live by?
Jesus answered, “I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.

20. What would be your ideal writer profession ambition?
Famous, five-time Pulitzer prize winning author, who helps others achieve the same for themselves by participating in free public workshops.

21. Would you like to ask me a question?
No. I’d like to ask YOU 21 questions.

Bring it on, oh Captain, my Captain! I’d be honored to answer.

Love the answers, Don! Especially to questions: 12, 15, 17, 20 and 21. Again, take it from me and READ THIS BRILLIANT WRITER’S WORK! He’s prize winning on and off the page. Thanks again to Don, I am very fortunate to have him as a fellow writing group member and friend. See you at group and an event soon!

 
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Posted by on October 27, 2014 in Unedited Quill Spills

 

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Motivational Words for the Weekend…

lilmountain:

This was originally posted for Memorial Day in 2013. These quotes never lose appeal to me. Enjoy the weekend and workout hard, I plan to!
New author interview on Monday.

Cheers,
Lisa

Originally posted on Accidental Bohemian:

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Week two down and two more to go! Now the clothes fit looser, I feel lighter and more supple overall! Yet, I’m so craving a bacon burger loaded with all the fixin’s! No I’m not! Yes I am! No!… no… I’m good! I can do this and a burger with salad will suffice! My friend feels we may need more than four weeks, and that’s okay, because we’re heading towards the finish line and that’s what matters. I will be having that aforementioned treat as soon as week four is done, I know, I’m bad but we all have our crosses to bear… :)

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Besides exercising and visiting the theatre, I am looking forward to breaking out the fire pit and instead of marshmallows, I’ll be kindling slices of pineapples and peaches instead… no I won’t… yes I will!

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Happy Memorial Day Weekend!

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My latest (favorite) review of my book found on Goodreads

Kate Nivison made a comment on her review of Feedback

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No one could say this book lacks pace. I went through it as if riding the NYC subway on something stronger than caffeine and having to stay on board until it reached the end of the line because that was the only way I would know where it was going. Reminded me of Woody Allen: ‘I love New York – I’m only leaving because my analyst is leaving.’ Think ‘Sex and the City’ without the pictures. A book for the ‘Me’ generation, with no turn unstoned. Likeable characters, head v heart dilemmas, guilt trips – those who like this sort of read will love it. With its open-ended issues trailing more to come, Feedback could easily be taken up as TV series for when the kids are in bed. Books should only be critiqued for what they set out to do, and this is a very good one of its kind. For something more like a nice cup of cocoa, try my Travelling Light: Short Stories & Travel Writing to Take You Away From it All

Thanks to Kate for this and all the reviews I’ve received thus far. Check all of them by clicking on the links below:

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/21546666-feedback

I’m putting the finishing touches on the latest author interview, stay tuned!

 
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Posted by on October 20, 2014 in Unedited Quill Spills

 

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Wow! 76 views from France this week!

Wow! 76 views from France this week!.

 
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Posted by on October 17, 2014 in Unedited Quill Spills

 

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Wow! 76 views from France this week!

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And 73 views just today from a person in France! I don’t know whether to be thrilled or alarmed? Is this a fan or a harassing-law-breaking-stalker? Let’s hope they’re the former and not the (pathetic) latter. Special thanks to all my viewers from around the world – I lucked out with the support.

Check out a new author interview here on Monday!

Peace & Love,
Lisa

P.s. one of my favorite proverbs: “never, ever, mess with a writer” ;)

 
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Posted by on October 17, 2014 in Unedited Quill Spills

 

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